posterpresentation
Description

Title: 0883 - Fracture Strength of Three CAD-CAM Materials for Inlay Restorations

Authors:

Carolina Mesa (Presenter)
Fundacion Universitaria CIEO UniCIEO

Maria Alejandra Gorron, Fundacion Universitaria CIEO UniCIEO
Julieth Giselle Palacio, Fundacion Universitaria CIEO UniCIEO
Edgar Torres, Fundacion Universitaria CIEO UniCIEO

Abstract:

Objectives: To compare the fracture strength of inlay restorations fabricated in three CAD-CAM materials (IPS e.max® CAD, VITA Enamic®, and CERASMART™ GC).

Methods: Experimental in vitro study. The research protocol was approved by IRB. Fifteen (15) healthy upper premolars were selected and prepared for occlusal-mesial inlays. The specimens were then scanned and duplicated in a photopolymerization resin (Formlabs® Flexible) obtaining three (3) identical copies of each premolar, total sample (n=45). Inlays were scanned and milled in three different CAD-CAM materials and then distributed into three groups: (n=15) IPS e.max® CAD (Em), (n=15) VITA Enamic® (En), and (n=15) CERASMART™GC (C). Subsequently, they were cemented with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX® U-200 3M-ESPE). Teeth were placed in an acrylic resin (Veracril® New Stetic), generating a calibrated space of 0.3mm, using smooth casting wax. PVS impression material (Silagum® DMG) was used to fill this space, in order to simulate periodontal ligament. The mechanical test was performed using a universal testing machine (Instron® 5586). A 2.5mm cylindrical rounded-end tip was placed in the functional fossa and load (crosshead speed 0.5 mm/min) was applied until inlay fracture. Statistical analysis was made using one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni test.

Results: Em inlay restorations reported the highest fracture strength values, while En showed the lowest. Statistically significant differences (p<0,05) were observed when fracture strength of Em (411.825N) was compared with En and C (312.924N, 338.327N respectively). No statistically significant differences were observed when En and C were compared (p>0,05).

Conclusions: Ceramic inlay restorations (IPS e.max® CAD) have higher fracture strength than the hybrid (VITA® Enamic) and polymeric inlays (CERASMART™ GC). All materials evaluated in this study demonstrated clinically acceptable fracture strength values, according to the scientific evidence previously reported.

Student Presenter

Disclosure Statement:
The submitter must disclose the names of the organizations with which any author have a relationship, the nature of the relationship, and the clinical or research area involved. The following is submitted: NONE

Tags